Mississippi Sex Ed Equates Sexually Active Girls To A Dirty York Peppermint Pattie

At least one school district in Mississippi is having students unwrap a York Peppermint pattie and pass it around the room to simulate what happens when you sleep with too many partners.

“They’re using the Peppermint Pattie to show that a girl is no longer clean or valuable after she’s had sex — that she’s been used,” said public health educator Marie Barnard to the LA Times, about sex ed teaching methods in Oxford, Mississippi.

According to Jezebel:

In 2011 the state passed a law that at least opened up the option for schools to teach more comprehensive sex ed than they had before; schools can choose between abstinence-only education or something called abstinence-plus, which emphasizes abstinence but mentions contraception. A report that came out in February said that “Of the 151 school districts and four special schools in Mississippi, 81 chose ‘abstinence-only,’ 71 chose ‘abstinence plus,’ and three chose a combined approach.” According to a separate study, 12 percent of schools still aren’t teaching sex ed at all.

The non-profit education policy organization Mississippi First has praised the program, but others think it has a long way to go. Other issues that have come up besides comparing girls to dirty chocolate include: sex ed being taught to boys and girls separately, demonstrations about how a condom works being disallowed, an emphasis on the failure rate of condoms, the fact that students need signed permission slips from their parents to be in these classes and that the law requires students understand that having gay sex is technically illegal in Mississippi (that last point, by the way, is illegal in itself).

Jezebel also points out that the backwards sex ed program in Mississippi may be one of the reasons why the state has the highest rates of chlamydia and gonorrhea in the country and where a third of babies are born to teen mothers.