Texas Lawmaker Proposes $100 Fine For Men Who Masturbate, Requires Rectal Exam For Viagra

If Texas State Rep. Jessica Farrar (D-Houston) has her way, men in Texas will have to pay a $100 fine for “unregulated masturbatory emissions” and undergo “a medically-unnecessary digital rectal exam and magnetic resonance imagining of the rectum before administering an elective vasectomy or colonoscopy procedure, or prescribing Viagra.”

Farrar’s bill is a satirical version of a Texas law passed in 2011 that requires women to have a sonogram and hear a detailed description of the fetus before getting an abortion, reports the Dallas News.

Texas state representative Jessica FarrarTexas state representative Jessica Farrar

“A lot of people find the bill funny,” Farrar told the Houston Chronicle. “What’s not funny are the obstacles that Texas women face every day, that were placed there by legislatures making it very difficult for them to access health care.”

Bill 4260 describes masturbatory emissions outside a vagina or a medical facility as “an act against an unborn child” that fails to preserve “the sanctity of life.”

Farrar, who is currently serving her 11th term as state representative for District 148, recently spoke out this week against the fetal remains bill, which would require hospitals to cremate or bury fetal remains.

She tweeted: “The fetal remains bill imposes state-sponsored moral beliefs on women, affecting their ability to make personal decisions with their doctor.”

Farrar said she included the ” medically-unnecessary digital rectal exam” into the bill to mimic the trans-vaginal ultrasound woman have when they are seeking an abortion.

“It’s to show how invasive this medically unnecessary procedure is,” She said. “When a woman has to have a trans-vaginal ultrasound, it has nothing to do with her healthcare. One of the state’s objectives is to guilt her into changing her mind.”

The Dallas News adds:

The Texas Capitol has been churning out anti-abortion legislation for years. But the state’s conservatives were dealt a blow last year when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that two provisions of a 2013 Texas law were unconstitutional. One would have required abortion clinics to have admitting privileges at hospitals, and another would have made clinics adhere to standards of ambulatory surgical centers.

The country’s highest court decided that those provisions would place an undue burden on women.

Yet the ruling has not deterred abortion foes in Texas, who have filed bills this session that would ban what they call “partial-birth” and “dismemberment” abortions. Doctors point out that neither phrase is a medical term and that late-term abortions in which the fetus is removed from the uterus intact are already illegal.